October 2018

Inspired by the Arts

A mighty mezzo

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When opera singer Emily Geller was growing up in Manhasset on Long Island, the parts she really wanted to play in the school musical weren’t coming her way. 

At home in the lodge

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When two kindred souls come together, they have double the power to forge something wonderful. Such was the case with Abbott and Christina Fleur, the proprietors of Honey Maple Grove Lodge, a tranquil and natural retreat hidden in the hills of Bedford.

Jewelry on the edge

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Jewelry designers are often called jewelry artists – and an exhibition opening this month at the Katonah Museum of Art shows just why. We offer a sneak peek of the highly anticipated “Outrageous Ornament: Extreme Jewelry in the 21st Century,” curated by Jane Adlin, former curator of modern and contemporary design at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Get your Ming vases now

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Anyone interested in collecting Chinese antiques or contemporary artwork originating in China should buy it now or you may wind up paying up to an additional 25 percent more in American tariffs.

Illustrating White Plains History

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Edmund F. Ward may not have been as famous as his Art Students League of New York classmate Norman Rockwell, but his works depicting White Plains history captured an aspect of the city that is the seat of Westchester County government.

Writing her next chapter

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Novelist Elin Hilderbrand was living an idyllic life on Nantucket when she was blindsided four years ago by breast cancer. She tells her story of survival and hope next month at the “More Than Pink” Luncheon in Darien.

A wellness bibliography

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WAG Wellness guru Giovanni Roselli is often asked from both fitness professionals and enthusiasts alike about his recommendations for books, shows, documentaries and apps regarding the health and fitness industry. Here are some of his top picks.

Too funny for words

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She may not know tin from aluminum, but comedian, author and NPR panelist and podcaster Paula Poundstone has a good idea what makes us happy – and what’s currently depressing the hell out of us.

Break the rules

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Following design rules may get the job done but it doesn’t create particularly inspiring rooms, Wares columnist Cami Weinstein writes. The first rule of design may be to break the rules for more creative, artistic spaces.

Monkee business

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In November 1968, Columbia Pictures released “Head,” a feature film starring The Monkees. The film was produced on a low budget of approximately $750,000 and, after a wave of withering reviews from the New York and Hollywood media, it was quickly withdrawn, grossing a mere $16,111 during its brief theatrical run. Fast-forward a half-century and “Head” is now considered to be among the most innovative works of the late 1960s.

Audra McDonald sings ‘happy’

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With a powerful and impressive vocal range that encompasses opera, musical theater and Billie Holiday, Audra McDonald is the singer’s singer. Gregg Shapiro caught up with her ahead of her appearance at Carnegie Hall’s opening night gala.